Job Searching and Contact Information – Keep it Clean and Keep it Simple

I have said it before and I am sure I will say it many more times, looking for a job is a job in itself. 

 

Rarely have I talked to someone who would describe the experience as pleasant.  Strike that, I don’t think I have ever talked to anyone who describes job searching as anything near pleasant.

 

There are times that you might feel everything is stacked against you, or that those powers that be that are evaluating your resume are playing by a set of rules that they just will not share with you.

 

Most often, if you are rejected for a position you never know why.

 

Do you know that it could be something as simple or small as your email address?

 

Email Addresses: Keep it Clean

 

If your email address is inappropriate, it could be landing your resume in the trash before they even get to your opening statement.

 

Not fair?  Maybe, but remember the powers that be and those rules that no one is telling you about…

 

The line of thinking is that if you are applying for a professional position you are professional enough to assume it and perform the role.  If you have an email that completely counteracts that professional image it could be sending the wrong message.

 

Quick fix: create a simple, clean email address.  It only takes a few minutes to set up an email account.  The bonus of this is when you setup a separate email for job searching, you know everything in that account is about your job search.  No wading through emails about the kids school activities, family messages, friends jokes or links – just all about the search.

 

A last thought on your email: if submitting your resume electronically, be sure to make your email address a hyperlink.  That way when the powers that be are reading your resume and think, “Wow, I really want to contact this person,” all they have to do is click on the link at the top of your page.    

 

They are busy folks here, do not make they go through the process of copy and pasting into an email.  Normally in Word when you hit the space bar after typing an email address it automatically formats it into a hyperlink (as indicated by the blue coloring and underline). 

 

If for some reason it does not, move the cursor to the email, right click and choose hyperlink and recreate.

 

Email Addresses: Keep it Simple

 

Another piece of your contact information is your phone number.  I advise my clients to only use one phone number.  Those powers that be are busy folks.  We do not want to make them have to make a choice as to which number or presume that they will call both and leave a message. 

 

Keep it simple and just use one phone number in your contact information.  It can also help you eliminate some anxiety on your part.  What if they left a message on your home number and you did not receive it until the evening when you got home?  That initial excitement feeling could quickly be overcome with the feeling of “oh shoot, I have to wait until tomorrow to call them back.”

 

When you call them back the next day, you might have to leave a voicemail.  And the game of tag begins, but you are not aware you are getting tagged until late in the evening.

 

Of course, leaving a cell phone number can lead to the game of tag, too.  Primarily I am a proponent of only using one phone number so it makes it easier for the powers that be.  Also, when you only list one phone number there is no reason to give it a descriptor, i.e “Home” or “Cellular”.  Just list the phone number.

 

Every aspect of your resume is important, even the smallest detail like a phone number or email address.  One phone number without a descriptor and one simple email will make your letterhead on your resume, cover letter and any communication look much more professional and clean. 

 

Lisa K McDonald, CPRW

Brand Strategist & Career Coach

Certified Professional Resume Writer

www.CareerPolish.com

 

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