The Best Way To Write Your Resume – Stop Trying to Write A Resume

cheshire-cat-doesnt-do-resumes

Now how does that title make sense? Not writing your resume is the best way to write your resume?

It does seems like Cheshire Cat logic – but don’t disappear on this idea just yet. Read on and hopefully the concept will be more clear than the cat in all his glory up in the tree.

(Oh that was terrible, I apologize, I seem to have some weird fixation on Alice in Wonderland theme going on. It probably will not get any better…)

You want to write a resume document, but not write the document as a resume.

More Cheshire Cat logic?

It is the approach, Alice – all in how you think about this document, and its purpose,  that will make the difference between painstaking or productive. It will also have a significant impact on the content and if it will garner the attention that you really want.

But first, why should you not perceive or approach writing this document as a resume:

  1. Most everyone hates writing resumes (except professional resume writers, we are a unique sort) so you are already in a bad mood about it. When has anything turned out well when you start off all sour about it?
  2. Hardly anyone freely and easily speaks ‘resume’ (again, except us professional resume writers – we are the hit of the party with this one) so it is not a comfortable writing style.
  3. Most resumes templates are geared toward duty based documents. If you have not done this in a while or just doing research to help freshen it up, odds are you are going to come across a template or two.
  4. You might ask friends to take a look at their resume, just keep in mind most do-it-yourself resumes are duty based. This means that the bullet points under each position neatly and vaguely tell the reader what the person was hired to do. Meaningless. Just because you were hired for these things does not mean you did them or did them very well.
  5. It might be a natural inclination to assume.  No need to tell the reader what something means, they should be ale to figure it out, right? Wrong. They know nothing more than what you tell them. They are not going to read further than what is presented to them. That is not their job. It is your job to tell them what they need to know in a clear and meaningful way.

The key to writing a resume without thinking about it as a resume is to think of it as a conversation.A conversation to tell your story, the way you want the reader to understand it.

Cheshire Cat again?

Vary rarely will a career have a straight and narrow path up, up, up. For most of us, it is a windy, twisty road full of the unexpected. To anyone else, it does not make sense why you went to this company or that, how this position came about and promoted into that one.

This is your story, you may be the only one who truly gets it.

So your job is to bridge the gap between all the twists and turns with the reason why the reader would want to talk to you: your value.

The common thread between all the positions you are listing is the value you provide by performing duties leveraging your strengths, skills and expertise.

So when writing your resume, sit down at that computer or pad of paper and have a conversation. Think about writing out your side of a conversation with the Cheshire Cat looming above asking:

  1. How did you get there?
  2. What were you originally hired to do?
  3. How did the job every change after you started?
  4. What did you like most about the job?
  5. What did you learn while you were there?
  6. Any other questions that get your mind thinking about the value you provided

Respond in full, write it all out as though you were having a conversation because that is where you will find the hidden nuggets of value to transform into a value-based document.

The fun part is going back and slashing and dashing to make sure each bullet point is now demonstrating value. Don’t forget the key words and let your old friend Mr. Thesaurus help you out to start making it sound more resume-ish.

Once you start getting the knack of storytelling for value purpose, you will soon have a resume that even the Red Queen would read!

(Oh yes, I had to finish it up in the Alice in Wonderland theme, it could have been worse – I am a huge X-Men fan, just think what I could have done with Wolverine references!)

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As the Founder and Principle of Career Polish, Inc., a national career coaching and practice firm, I am an Executive Brand Strategist, Resume Writer and Career Coach. I work with individual clients, companies, leadership and teams to identify, strengthen and effectively communicate their brand, engagement, commitment and most importantly – their value – by learning and leveraging LinkedIn, resumes, networking, communication, relationship management, presence and influence.
I help people get from where they are in their jobs to where they want to be in their careers.

Click here – CareerPolish.com – to find out more about how we can help you.

★ In order to be kept up to date on all my articles Click the “Yes Please!” button on the right side. 

Forced Into Finding a New Job – Ask ‘What’ Not ‘Why’

rearview-mirror-why

I thought I was having a bad day yesterday, I was not.  My boyfriend was having a bad day.

He was scheduled to take two flights to come home and arrive at noon.  Key word: scheduled.

The first flight was delayed an hour due to ice on the plane’s wings.

After sprinting to the next flight and having them hold the door for him, he made the second.

A half an hour before landing they encountered a storm.  Not just any storm, a storm that caused three failed landing attempts, severe turbulence, rerouting three hours away and the need for paramedics once landed.

He finally made it home hours later, safe and mostly sound.  As he recounted the events on the plane, an old habit crept into my head, I began asking ‘why?’

Once I realized I slipped into a bad habit of asking ‘why’, I asked ‘what’.

Asking ‘why’ is asking for a definitive answer or explanation leading to a specific action: why did events conspire for him to make that connection and it turned out to be a horrifying event?

Not the best place to go, asking ‘why’.

On the other hand, asking ‘what’ is asking why something happened as a catalyst to something yet undone.

The ‘why’ to the ‘what’ is the determination of something happening to you or through you and the key to moving on in a positive way.

Let’s use another example closer to my area of expertise: you lost your job.

The company is downsizing and they decided to keep the bonehead with a lot less experience rather than you.

Asking ‘why me? I had more experience, I was better, now what am I going to do?’ is a finality.  All events up to that time no longer matter because it is done.  Asking ‘why’ from this perspective just helps dig your feet in the sand and get stuck.

You want clarity on the past, which is like staring at an accident in your rear view mirror trying to figure out how it happened as you are still trying to move forward – which will cause you to ram into the guy in front of you and create a whole new set of problems.

Ask ‘what next, now I have to do something else, so what is it and what do I do to get there?’ Asking ‘what’ is noticing and being impacted by the accident, but keeping your eyes forward and being aware of your surroundings so you can get to where you want to go safely.

The ‘what’ leads to big, ambiguous questions and lots of smaller nagging questions, that probably will not have an immediate answer.  However, ‘what’ allows you to start creeping past the accident, unharmed.

Creeping past may look like realizing you need to start job searching.

And thoughts begin to flow:

  • You need to update your resume.
  • You need to start letting your network know you are looking so they can help you.
  • You need to update professional sites and bios.
  • You need to start looking for a new job.
  • Maybe you want to take a break and decompress from a job that was way too stressful.
  • Maybe you don’t want to go back into that industry.
  • Maybe you realize you really hated your job.
  • Maybe you see something that gets you excited, even though completely unrelated to what you did, and you decide to go for it.

The ‘what’ is freedom and empowerment.  It gives you an opportunity to explore and act on things you would not have if the ‘why’ did not happen, and that makes you realize that huge accident was merely a flat tire on the side of the road, merely a minor inconvenience of an otherwise great drive.

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As the Founder and Principle of Career Polish, Inc., a national career coaching and practice firm, I am an Executive Brand Strategist, Resume Writer and Career Coach. I work with individual clients, companies, leadership and teams to identify, strengthen and effectively communicate their brand, engagement, commitment and most importantly – their value – by learning and leveraging LinkedIn, resumes, networking, communication, relationship management, presence and influence.
I help people get from where they are in their jobs to where they want to be in their careers.

Click here – CareerPolish.com – to find out more about how we can help you.

★ In order to be kept up to date on all my articles Click the “Yes Please!” button on the right side. 

 

 

 

 

Thanksgiving – A Time To Create Your Own Personal Sales Force

thanksgiving-family

I remember as a little girl having huge family gatherings for Thanksgiving with extended family that I only saw once a year catching up around enough food to feed an army.

It was fun, although what I remember most is a slice pumpkin pie hidden under mounds of whipped cream. Maybe that is what I enjoyed the most.

I realize some may be dreading this tradition tomorrow, but to that I say: why not use the opportunity presented if you are looking for a job?

Immediate, extended family or friends will probably try to make polite conversation and ask what you are doing now. Instead of dodging the question or answering with, “I’m looking for a job” generic gloss over, why not transform your family into your personal sales force?

What exactly is your own personal sales force?  It is your people identifying potential opportunities and selling you or bringing the information back to you to follow up on.

If you tell your family that you are merely looking for a job and Great Uncle Ed says there is an opening as a road kill cleaner-upper, are you going to jump on that?  Probably not, although, hats off if you do, someone needs to do that thankless job. Thank you road kill cleaner-uppers!

This is the critical part: you must translate what you do and what you are looking for in a way that your family understands it.  If they get what you do and what you want they will more easily recognize it when they hear it. This, in turn, makes it easier for them to sell you to others and/or bring back the opportunity to you.

The first thing to do is to understand exactly what it is you do – not in a job, but in terms of value.  What value do you provide to others?  This does not mean a title.  Titles are only given value by those who hear them which is based on their own experience.

In other words, if you work for a mortgage company and second cousin removed Gertrude just had her home foreclosed, you might just get a turkey leg hurled in your direction if you tell her you  are a mortgage broker.  She won’t know what you do, but she will associate you with the not so nice experience she encountered.

Back to the critical part – if you family understands your value, they can sell you any time anywhere, as demonstrated by my son when he was in high school.

Between football practices he brought a buddy home to raid the fridge and hang out.

His friend asked what I did and my son replied, “she helps people get jobs.”  Cringing out of sight (because that was not at all how I would say it and felt like he didn’t get it), I let the conversation continue.

Which was a good thing because then, the magic unfolded.

His friend asked how.

Boom baby! 

He got it. He presented it in the perfect way – for his audience to ask a question.

He then explained that I work with them doing their resumes, help with interviewing and ‘all the stuff that helps them get a job’.

Then next day his friend’s dad called and hired me.

My cousin is a tech genius.  I am clearly not.  He had to explain what he did to me in a way that I got it, which included using simple examples that related to my personal or business life without using technical jargon.  I was not offended, I was relieved because I finally got what he did and was not afraid to ask about it anymore.

It is not necessary to know the exact job you want.  Giving your family some parameters with this is helpful.  For example you may tell them that you have worked mainly in banking but would not mind going into brokerage or insurance.

Or simply tell them that what you do could be in a lot of different areas so you are not looking for one industry.

Relax on be perfect and fine tuning a pitch. You are not on a job interview or formal networking event. This is honest to goodness labored over turkey, stuffing, and all the fixins here people, not networking chicken!

Talk to your family and friends. When you explain what you do, it is okay to ask them if it makes sense to them.

The more they know the more they can help, and isn’t that part of the whole family thing?

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As the Founder and Principle of Career Polish, Inc., a national career coaching and practice firm, I am an Executive Brand Strategist, Resume Writer and Career Coach. I work with individual clients, companies, leadership and teams to identify, strengthen and effectively communicate their brand, engagement, commitment and most importantly – their value – by learning and leveraging LinkedIn, resumes, networking, communication, relationship management, presence and influence.
I help people get from where they are in their jobs to where they want to be in their careers.

Click here – CareerPolish.com – to find out more about how we can help you.

★ In order to be kept up to date on all my articles Click the “Yes Please!” button on the right side. 

 

Now That You Have The Job You Don’t Need Your Resume, Right? Wrong

trashing-your-resume

You polished up your resume and landed a great job.  Now, sometime later, you are feeling the career itch again.  You are ready to make a move for more; more responsibility, opportunity, challenges or ability to learn new skills.

Great, if you have not kept your resume updated, now is the time to freshen it up for that next step.

Oh no, you tell me, you do not need to because the opportunities you want are internal, with the company you are with right now.  You won’t need a resume, they know you.

Wrong and wrong.

You do need a resume to apply for positions internally and do not assume they know you.

It would be wise to have two base versions – an internal and external resume; however, we are going to focus on the internal resume in this article.

The biggest difference with an internal resume is it gives you the opportunity to really speak the company language.  You are one of them – let it show!  You know the mission, vision, values and goals of the company, integrate them within your resume to demonstrate your understanding, commitment and contributions to these core pillars of the organization.

In other words: walk the walk, talk the talk of your company.

This is your edge.  Many organizations require existing employees to submit resumes for internal opportunities.  They also accept external resumes.  Do not rest in false comfort that just because you are already employed by the company that you are shoe-in for the position.

If you do not demonstrate value and an external candidate does, guess who will get the job?

This is where having a false sense of security if ‘they know me’ deflects from effort into your internal resume.

Your existing department may know you, but dose the individuals in the next arena?  Even if it is a promotion within your department, do they really know you?  Do they really know that you truly get and incorporate the company values, mission and goals into your everyday performance?

Putting that extra effort into an internal resume, rather than simply listing the jobs you have held since being with the company, will demonstrate two key factors:

  1. You get it (‘It’ being the company mission, philosophy, goals, vision and purpose)
  2. You care about this promotion, want it and worked for it. You were willing to put together a presentation that demonstrates you are the right candidate and did not assume it was a given.

Approach your internal resume from the external perspective.  What is important for this position? What skills will you need to demonstrate to prove you will be successful? What successes or accomplishments can you promote that supports your value?

Most importantly: write your bullets as value statements, not job duties.  For more on this, click here: If You Want Your Resume Read Do Not List Job Duties

Once you finish polishing your internal resume, put a gentle reminder on your calendar to go back now and then to keep it current.  If nothing else, make notes about important projects, contributions and accomplishments along the way so it will be much easier to quickly whip it into shape for that next more opportunity!

 

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As the Founder and Principle of Career Polish, Inc., a national career coaching and practice firm, I am an Executive Brand Strategist, Resume Writer and Career Coach. I work with individual clients, companies, leadership and teams to identify, strengthen and effectively communicate their brand, engagement, commitment and most importantly – their value – by learning and leveraging LinkedIn, resumes, networking, communication, relationship management, presence and influence.
I help people get from where they are in their jobs to where they want to be in their careers.

Click here – CareerPolish.com – to find out more about how we can help you.

★ In order to be kept up to date on all my articles Click the “Yes Please!” button on the right side. 

 

 

Write Your Resume Because Your Mother Said So

mom-because-i-said-so

 

When my son Jake was growing up, “because I said so” was not – in his mind – a valid reason for a request.

He was, and is, stubborn, intelligent, quick witted and a challenge-any-establishment-kind of kid. As he gets older, I can appreciate these qualities, most of the time. Of course there are still times that I have had enough of the challenge and the old, “because your mother said so” comes out signaling an end of discussion.

What I found most helpful when dealing with my son was to explain, in a manner which he understood, the why emphasizing the benefit to him.  Of course, there was normally another benefit, but that was hidden behind the ‘him’ reason because, quite frankly, that is the only reason he really cared about.

For example cooking.

All my boys learned to cook.  It was a requirement. Once a week they were responsible for planning and executing a meal.  Not a pop tarts with a side of mac and cheese meal, a real meal.  I taught them how to budget and shop for the necessary food; prepare and serve; and clean up after the meal.

My reasons were it gave me a break from cooking meals and eliminated any whining about what was for dinner. I also did not want to hear years later from a potential daughter-in-law that her husband never cooks.  That would be on her because my boys were going to learn to fend for themselves.

The reason I gave them: girls really like a guy who can cook and cooks for them.  Worked like a charm.  Of course, years later my son told me I was right, girls loved that he could cook; and his friends were also quite impressed with his budget/cooking savvy.

So what does this have to do with your resume?  A slightly odd parallel, but one nonetheless. You are learning to fend for yourself in writing your own resume.  During job searching and networking, people really like a person who knows their value, how they can contribute to others and can communicate it clearly for them to understand.

That is the baseline of your resume – to discover and be able to communicate your value – even if no one ever reads it.

Your resume is the baseline for everything for career transitions, whether looking for a change in industries or moving up in your current profession.  You have to know what you are cooking, what ingredients go into it and how to present it before anyone is going to be daring enough to take a bite.

There is a lot of preparation that goes into a meal. You have to know what ingredients you need, have a budget for the food, plan cooking times knowing some items will take longer than others, understand what seasonings or add ins are going to make or break each dish.

That is your resume.  A detailed look at what you have done in the past knowing the intricacies that make you unique and valuable.

Simply giving a description of what you were hired to do in the past is like opening a can of beans and plopping it in a bowl and calling it a side.

Start breaking your position down into pieces. Start with a general statement: what did you do?  Let’s stay with the cooking theme, and I am going to be very generic on this as it is an attempt at a fun example.

  • What did you do? I was a cook.
  • What does that mean, what did you do as a cook?  I prepared food.
  • How, what was involved? I had to get all the ingredients, plan and prepare the meals.
  • Who did you work with? I had staff that helped prepare and order.
  • How did you work with them? I oversaw some to make sure we had an accurate inventory and when to order; I worked with others making sure they got their items prepared at the right time before and during the dinner rush.
  • How did you do that? I met with the order staff weekly to go through all the items, plan meals and prepare orders. The assistants I trained them on how to cook, prepare and present food.
  • Who did that benefit and how? Our customers – they had good food; the company – it made more money; me – it gave me more time; my staff – they did better at their jobs, more efficient and more skills so they got better reviews and some moved up into better cooking positions.

Go deep to start having the ‘who did you work with, how, what did you do and what was the benefit’ conversations.  This will reveal your value and allow you to translate that to a document that will be easily understood by the reader.

But what if no one ever reads it, like I said before? Not a problem.

Once you detail out your value, you will be able to communicate it to any audience.  The parameters of the format above are similar to the behavioral based interview style The STAR Method: Situation, Task, Action, Result.  Most interviews are behaviorally based.  Having completed the resume exercise you will be fully versed and comfortable answering behavioral based questions.

When networking you will be able to answer the question ‘what do you do’ from a value perspective which will generate much more interest than responding with simply your title. You will be able to translate your value in a manner that your audience will understand which will engage them.

Writing your resume is a great exercise to rediscover and reengage with the things you love to do, what ignites your passion, what drives you, what is fun for you to do and what you do best.  It gives you a little spark and jazzes you by remembering that you are pretty darn good at what you do. It helps you better communicate with your network or potential employers so they can clearly understand your value and see how it would benefit them – translating to wanting to have you on their team.

If those reasons are not enough for you, write your resume because your mother said so, or at least because Jake’s mom said so.

 

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As the Founder and Principle of Career Polish, Inc., a national career coaching and practice firm, I am an Executive Brand Strategist, Resume Writer and Career Coach. I work with individual clients, companies, leadership and teams to identify, strengthen and effectively communicate their brand, engagement, commitment and most importantly – their value – by learning and leveraging LinkedIn, resumes, networking, communication, relationship management, presence and influence.
I help people get from where they are in their jobs to where they want to be in their careers.

Click here – CareerPolish.com – to find out more about how we can help you.

★ In order to be kept up to date on all my articles Click the “Yes Please!” button on the right side. 

 

 

You Are Making Writing Your Own Resume Harder By Not Asking This One Question

pulling-your-hair-out-trying-to-write-your-own-resume

 

Writing your own resume stinks.

 

As a professional resume writer, I should probably be a bit more eloquent about it.  But let’s face it, you can put a pig in an Armani suit and it is still a pig.

 

No matter how much spin I put on it, if you are in the process of writing or updating your own resume I would bet dollars to donuts you have said more than once, either aloud or in your head, “this stinks!”  Or some version of that.

 

It does. It is hard.  You know what you want to say but not how to say it.  How do you fit everything in this one document? What do they want, what are they looking for? How can you make it look nice and not like a template? Why can’t this be easier?

 

All you want to do is to get this stupid thing together and demonstrate confidence in describing your value and expertise. Is that too much to ask?

 

Perhaps you have even gone to the web to do some research on how to write an amazing resume that gets attention.  Fantastic.  How long before you were overwhelmed with all the information and the amount of contradictory information?

 

That is just putting salt in the wound.

 

Stop the nonsense right now.  Step away from the resume, put down the coffee or wine that has been fueling the research and frustration of writing.  Stop writing, stop researching and stop thinking.

 

Stop, just stop.

 

There is one question I will bet you have not asked before you began this adventure and it just happens to be one of the most important questions to answer.  The answer will help frame your resume and align you with the jobs you want.

 

There is a catch – after you read the question, I do not want you to think it over, mull it around, take your time and devise a comprehensive answer.  Nope.  I want you to answer from the cuff.  Don’t think – just answer.

 

Are you ready?  Here it is:

 

What do you want people to know about you?

 

That’s it.  That is the big groundbreaking question.  It is as simple as that.  What do you want people to know about you.  That is your foundation. That is the whole point of your resume.  Getting your story across to the reader.  But before you can do that you have to know the central selling point of your story.

 

Start with that simple, easy answer.  Do you want them to know that you are great at sales? Or maybe you love developing teams and are really good at it. Perhaps that you are a compliance freak who loves the back office, in-depth research to solve the really hard problems. By the way, I still have a lot of compliance freak in me left over from my investment industry days so there were no stones thrown there.

 

Let’s take one of these: you are great at sales.

 

Ok, now what? Now, start filling in the blanks. We fill in the blanks by keep asking questions: why, how, who, what.

  • Why are you good at sales? What do you love about it?
  • How did you get to where you are? How do you ‘do’ sales better than anyone else?
  • Who do you work with?
  • How do you work with your clients, team members, home office, affiliates – any stakeholder that you interact with that improves your book and territory?
  • Who gains value from you doing what you do?
  • Who else? (your clients may get the value of your product, but how does you company gain value from what you do?)
  • How do you add value?
  • What is the value they receive?
  • What makes you unique?
  • What do you have that makes someone want to talk to you rather than someone else?

 

Now you are getting somewhere. Now you can start writing a resume that incorporates these elements into your opening and bullet points.  From this perspective you are demonstrating value, confidence and expertise.

 

Isn’t that what you wanted to come across in your resume all along?

 

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As the Founder and Principle of Career Polish, Inc., a national career coaching and practice firm, I am an Executive Brand Strategist, Resume Writer and Career Coach. I work with individual clients, companies, leadership and teams to identify, strengthen and effectively communicate their brand, engagement, commitment and most importantly – their value – by learning and leveraging LinkedIn, resumes, networking, communication, relationship management, presence and influence.
I help people get from where they are in their jobs to where they want to be in their careers.

Click here – CareerPolish.com – to find out more about how we can help you.

★ In order to be kept up to date on all my articles Click the “Yes Please!” button

Confidence vs Cocky & Not Crossing The Line in Resumes, Job Searching & Networking

nervous interviewee

“I want to tell people what I do and that I am good at it, but I feel like it sounds like I am bragging.”

This is a sentiment I hear a lot from job seekers, people looking to advance in their careers or in trying to build a bigger client base. It all comes down to one simple question: “How do you convey your value in a confident way without sounding cocky?”

The concept of the answer is simple, yet the communication involves combining three key elements: believing, demonstrating which tie into delivery.

Believing

Quite simply – you have to believe you are good at what you do. Some might think “of course I believe it, I am just having trouble saying it.”  Maybe.    The problem may lie in how you start the conversation.  I recently had a conversation with an consultant and I asked him how he describes himself to prospective clients.

He began with, “I tell them that I think I am a good….”

Think?

I asked him, “Do you think you are good at what you do or do you know you are good at what you do?  He said he knows he is good. The problem with leading with “I think” is you create doubt in your audience.  Why would they have any greater confidence in you than you do yourself?

Self-talk is important.  It is what fuels the “I think”.  Be very careful in how you talk to yourself.

Demonstrating

No one is going to simply take your word for it.  Not only do we live in a cynical world, there is way too much fibbing going on in resumes and networking.  I do not believe it is in our nature to simply take a stranger’s word for something. If you meet someone tomorrow and they tell you they can double your investment in 30 days are you going to simply take their word for it?  If so, I’ve got a bridge in Brooklyn you are going to love!

Throwing a bunch of numbers might get their attention, but that is not all it takes to demonstrate your effectiveness.  If you are looking to hire a new sales person and a candidate tells you they increased their book of business 45%, are you going to be satisfied that they are the right fit?  Probably not, because there is one important question that follows that statement – how?

If they identified a new market, designed the strategy and captured a significant portion in just a few months or identified an opportunity to increased value to existing clients with a complimentary upsell that demonstrates.  Inheriting a territory does not demonstrate that they had any direct impact on that uptick.

How do you do what you do? Sometimes you can demonstrate this by telling a story. Other times it is effective to demonstrate by using your audience as an example.  With every client I have a pre-interview to review their current resume or LinkedIn profile.  I will use examples within their current material to convey how it could be interpreted and then describe a solution.  This allows them to get an understanding of not only what I do, but how I do it and as important – how I communicate.

Delivery

Believing and demonstrating directly impact delivery. The key to an exceptional delivery that you are comfortable with is to reconnect with one the most critical element of your value: why do you do what you do?

The best leaders I have known, regardless of industry or title, all have two things in common:

  1. They stink at talking about themselves.
  2. They love what they do.

The purpose of this article is to help with number one.  But number two – that is the missing ingredient.  Get back to that place of knowing, and feeling, why you do what you do.  Get excited about it!

Do you love it?  Then do not hold back.  So what if it is something that most people can relate to – if you love it, embrace it! That love is a big part of why you are so good at it.  It fuels passion, a desire for excellence and a continued commitment to improvement.

And really, do you think it can sound any crazier than saying you love writing resumes and LinkedIn profiles?  For most people writing those things ranks up there with a root canal without anesthesia.

Not me.

I ask one question often during the pre-interview to every single client: “Does that make sense?” I explain that I get a little excited about what I do and I can get on a roll so I stop and ask that question often to make sure that I do not overwhelm them.  Yes, every single client because no matter what the project, I am a freak about personal branding – I love it. There is nothing better than having someone see themselves from a value perspective and get reengaged and excited about themselves and their opportunities. This love transcends to coaching.  Love it!

Start from that place and then tell them how you do what you do.  It is how you will differential yourself in your market and your audience will see you as confident with a tremendous amount of value to offer.

 

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As the Founder and Principle of Career Polish, Inc., a national career coaching and practice firm, I am an Executive Brand Strategist, Resume Writer and Career Coach. I work with individual clients, companies, leadership and teams to identify, strengthen and effectively communicate their brand, engagement, commitment and most importantly – their value – by learning and leveraging LinkedIn, resumes, networking, communication, relationship management, presence and influence.
I help people get from where they are in their jobs to where they want to be in their careers.

Click here – CareerPolish.com – to find out more about how we can help you.

★ In order to be kept up to date on all my articles Click the “Yes Please!” button on the right side. 

 

 

What Always Worked Doesn’t Always Work in Job Searching

changes-in-technology

I remember in my twenties in college when I lived off cheesy garlic bread from the little Italian restaurant around the corner from my dorm, few hours of sleep each night and carried a full load of classes while working a part time job and a full commitment of games, practices and workouts as a member of the dance squad.

I also remember when my son was younger and played three sports taking him to every practice, game and activity; working a full time job; caring for a family member battling cancer; managing a house and four dogs.

Where oh where is all that energy now?  There are days I look around and think, ‘I used to be able to do so much more!’

There are also times that I attempt to do something and think, ‘this used to be a lot easier’ with things like house repairs or climbing flights of stairs.  Age is a wonderful thing, I used to be able to leg press three times my body weight, now I sound like a percussion section every time I stand up!

I recently embarked on some house repairs and updates.  Nothing I really had not done before, yet this time it seemed more time consuming and a bit more of a hassle.  Nothing I could really put my finger on, but I did find myself saying, ‘it always worked before when I did this or that.’

That was the light bulb.  Just because something always worked in the past does not mean it will work again today or in the future.  We need to adapt.  Some of the projects were more difficult because the strength in my hands is not what it used to be.  Some were easier because there are better and neater tools and gadgets now.

If you are job searching, are you applying the ‘always worked in the past’ techniques?  Many of my clients had never had a resume, nor needed one.  It was a matter of a handshake or conversation.  The idea of having a branding statement if only to help define what it is they are selling (their value) to better communicate it to their audience is a complete unknown.

Resumes of the past were compiled of a desire statement “I am looking for a job that enables me to use my skills and abilities to help a company and its clients grow.”

The problem is, no one cares what you want.  What the reader wants to know is what can you do for them?  And no one really believed that line anyway.  Today you need to immediately identify what value you bring to the organization demonstrating you understand their challenges or pain points and know how to deliver the solutions.

Resumes of the past also detailed job duties – what you were hired to do.  It was very easy to transcribe your job description into your resume as bullet points.  Today, people do not care what you were hired to do, they want to know what you did.

Just because you list that your job duty is to manage a certain aspect does not mean you are any good at it.  How do you manage it, who do you work with, how do you work with them, who benefits and how demonstrates your value and expertise on the subject.

Networking in the past may have been telling your family that you are looking for a job.

Today you need to be more stealth in your approach.  Understand the value you add, what you want to do and learn to communicate it in a way that each of your different audiences can not only understand it, but can identify it when they hear others talk about it.  This way they can immediately say, “I know just the person you need to talk to!”

The biggest “always worked” action that I am on a persona mission to obliterate is assigning yourself a title.  Stop introducing yourself as your title.  That is not you!  That is the label that a company gave to you, it does not define you.

Instead, when someone asks you what you do – tell them what you really do: the value you add to people’s lives.  How do you solve problems for people, do you provide a service that makes their life easier or help them achieve a goal or desire? What is it that you really do?  That is what people care about, not your title.  It is also how people will remember you, refer and recommend you.

Change is scary yet there is a lot of help out there to help you take one small step at a time.  My recommendation – carve out a little private time to go through that last paragraph – what do you really do?  Dig deep, have a conversation and in the end you will be well on your way to finding a whole new way of communicating, job searching and networking that actually works for you.

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As the Founder and Principle of Career Polish, Inc., a national career coaching and practice firm, I am an Executive Brand Strategist, Resume Writer and Career Coach. I work with individual clients, companies, leadership and teams to identify, strengthen and effectively communicate their brand, engagement, commitment and most importantly – their value – by learning and leveraging LinkedIn, resumes, networking, communication, relationship management, presence and influence.
I help people get from where they are in their jobs to where they want to be in their careers.

Click here – CareerPolish.com – to find out more about how we can help you.

★ In order to be kept up to date on all articles Click the “Yes Please!” button on the right.

 

 

The Infestation of Fleas in Your Job Search

 

I have three dogs.  Three spoiled, indoor and office dogs.  If you call our office you might, just might, here a glimpse of them, although they are pretty well trained to know the sound of the phone triggers quiet time on their part.  That might just be the only way they are trained.

 

Being in the office every day and quite spoiled any other time, they see the great outdoors only to take care of nature calling and brisk walks in the neighborhood. In other words, these are not the hang outside all day kind of dogs.

 

I have not had a problem with fleas in years. 

 

Until this week. We are house sitting and in the evenings they have been enjoying the most beautiful backyard.  Of course they are forced to because I am greatly enjoying the overhanging trees, abundance of flowers, soothing sounds of the pond and many sightings of squirrels, hummingbirds, butterflies and more.  Forced because these spoiled little things will not go anywhere without me.

 

The other day I noticed one of my dogs scratching and doing the quick turns on his rear end with a quizzical look.  I did not think much of it because this is the same dog that gets frightened every time he passes gas.

 

He started scratching a bit more.  Then another one started scratching a little. Pretty soon it became a scratching party. About this time, while sitting outside, I happened to look down and noticed little black jumpy things lingering on my socks.  Uh oh.

 

As an over-analyzer, I immediately took to Google to learn all I could about these nasty little creatures.  Turns out, this beautiful yard is not only a heaven for me, but for fleas, too.  Awesome.  Off to the store I went – flea treatments for both the dogs and yard.  Yippee.

 

How on earth can such little jumpy things cause such distress?  Seriously, they are miniscule; and yet, wreaked havoc on my poor puppies – and me.

 

Now that we are comfortably enjoying some quiet time in the peaceful oasis, the connection to job searching hit me – doubt is fleas.

 

When first job searching you might start full of confidence, hope and positivity.  After sending out a resume or two the first flea jumps on: a flicker of doubt. It is easy to brush that one off and think it is your dogs getting werided out by his own farts, but then a bit more time passes and another couple fleas/doubts jump on board.

 

Things start to turn from a mild irritation Maybe they didn’t receive it to an annoying scratch I keep sending them out and not getting a response to a full on infestation Am I not good enough, am I over qualified, am I underqualified, I know I can do this – why are they ignoring me, I am getting responses to jobs I don’t want but nothing on the ones I do, am I too old, do I not have the right experience or education, what is wrong with me?

 

It is time to get the flea removal stuff.  And it stinks, but it is worth it.

 

First treatment – every time another flea/doubt jumps on or bites, recognize it and kill it immediately.  Am I not qualifiedsquash!of course I am!

 

Second treatment – look at your environment, this is your branding materials: your resume, networking communication, LinkedIn etc. Remove all fleas/doubt in those.  Make sure your resume is speaking to your value, not your duties.  What did you do, how did you do it, how did others benefit – this is the ROI of hiring you that potential investors (employers) want to see.

 

Third treatment – keep repeating the first treatment while reaching out to your network to convey what you are looking for in a way that they understand, identify for you and connect to you.  If they are not in your industry, do not confuse them with industry jargon. Ask for help and advice, yet use what feels right to you. Research ‘flea eradication’ and you will get a multitude of suggestions, but not everything is going to work for you.

 

Fourth treatment – stop trying to treat things that are not there.  Some products boasted that they killed certain other bugs – guess what, we don’t have them in this area.  Applying for jobs you do not want is a double whammy.  It feels twice as bad to get rejected for something you didn’t even want in the first place!

 

Fifth treatment – give yourself a flea bath, i.e., take time to relax and keep things in perspective.  Hiring is not always a one day deal.  There is a lot of time and money invested in finding quality candidates and it is during this process that time stands still.  Remember to relax, treat yourself and keep killing any stray fleas/doubts as soon as they pop up.

 

These little suckers do not start in a hoard, they build up to infestation just as doubt does.  Recognize it, treat it step by step and soon your confidence will be back and the right offer will be presented to you.

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As the Founder and Principle of Career Polish, Inc., a national career coaching and practice firm, I am an Executive Brand Strategist, Resume Writer and Career Coach. I work with individual clients, companies, leadership and teams to identify, strengthen and effectively communicate their brand, engagement, commitment and most importantly – their value – by learning and leveraging LinkedIn, resumes, networking, communication, relationship management, presence and influence.
I help people get from where they are in their jobs to where they want to be in their careers.

Click here – CareerPolish.com – to find out more about how we can help you.

★ In order to be kept up to date on all my articles ★
please visit LisaKMcDonald.com
 Click the “Yes Please!” button on the right side. 

Help Your Network Help You Get The Job You Want

 

nyc-subway-7

I had never been to New York City until this week.  All I can say is – I am going back.  I was there two days, walked over 20 miles and barely scratched the surface on things to experience, see and do.  I will not even start on the food, let’s just say it is a good thing I put on over 20 miles on the sneakers or I would come back looking like Violet from Willy Wonka after the bubble gum incident.

The trip was fantastic and we were so proud to say we were getting the hang of the subways.  We spoke too soon.  The last train back to the hotel after a full day of experiencing and we were exhausted.  We knew the station we needed to get off on so instead of plotting it out ourselves, we asked the subway expert for instructions.  We needed to go to Flushing.

Flushing Brooklyn that is.

It is not where we ended up.

We went to Flushing in Queens.

For anyone familiar with New York City, you are welcome for the laugh.  For anyone not familiar, these two places are, according to Mapquest, about an hour away via subway. They are not close.  There was a bit of backtracking before we were headed in the right direction.

I was not upset at the little impromptu adventure added to our trip, after all, who could I get mad at?  We asked for instructions for Flushing – we just did not specify – so we left it up to whomever we were talking with to fill in the blanks.

This is what can happen when job searching.  If you simply tell your friends, family and network that you are ‘looking for a job’ they might send you to Queens.  How do they know you want Brooklyn and not Queens if you do not specify?  It is not their fault, you left it way too open and allowed them to fill in the blanks.

To be honest, you do not want just any job.  I saw several people this week working tremendously hard at jobs I would not want to do or could not do.  Do you want to be the guy in the shop that cooks the ducks that are still staring at you as they roast?  How about the one stocking the local mart with the live frogs on the end cap?  Or a delivery driver in the heart of NYC?  Oh heck no!

You need to be specific when speaking to your network, yet speak in a language they understand.  When buying Dragon Fruit at the Asian market, we found unique ways of communicating as we had a very limited shared communication platform.

Use words that your network can relate to and more importantly, understand to repeat.  Do not simply leave it at a title or industry.  The only thing your network knows about titles or industries is this: what they have personally experienced or heard from their network.

Leaving it to simply an industry is much too vague.  Information Technology, that means nothing.  The possibilities within that industry are endless. Do you work on a help desk, system programming, analytics, accounting, sales – what do you do?  Then explain it in a way that relates to your audience.

Think of from their eyes. If you work with the help desk in some capacity, think about how they would interact with you or your department.  Perhaps saying something like, “You know when your company updates a system and the next morning you’re completely frozen out….I’m the guy/gal that makes sure that doesn’t happen.”

Give them something they can relate to and repeat to help you get to the right station in life and not wandering around for another hour stopping at every unrelated stop along the way.

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As the Founder and Principle of Career Polish, Inc., a national career coaching and practice firm, I am an Executive Brand Strategist, Resume Writer and Career Coach. I work with individual clients, companies, leadership and teams to identify, strengthen and effectively communicate their brand, engagement, commitment and most importantly – their value – by learning and leveraging LinkedIn, resumes, networking, communication, relationship management, presence and influence.
I help people get from where they are in their jobs to where they want to be in their careers.

Click here – CareerPolish.com – to find out more about how we can help you.

★ In order to be kept up to date on all my articles ★
please visit LisaKMcDonald.com
Click the “Yes Please!” button on the right side.